Thursday, December 08, 2016

Washington City Paper's annual "People" issue

Guess who is in the Washington City Paper annual People issue?

If you know what it’s like to find yourself at the table or on the couch chatting with someone you find utterly fascinating, then you have some idea of our collective delight in producing this week’s paper. Settle in, because there’s a lot of great stuff to read here.
Our fourth annual People Issue is City Paper’s effort to introduce you to some of the city’s most interesting folks, some of whom we already know, others we wanted to get to know on your behalf. We called them up, asked them to meet us for a conversation, and simply recorded what they said. They were also kind enough to sit for photos with our staff photographer Darrow Montgomery, whose portraits offer another layer of insight into the personalities who animate the following pages.  

The interviews have been edited for space and clarity, but we tried to keep all the most enchanting pearls. We’ve got an 84-year-old who fronts a local house band, a marijuana edibles entrepreneur, a drag queen, a (hot) transportation bureaucrat, a used bookstore owner who keeps his treasures in a secondhand bank vault, and so much more. —Liz Garrigan

The Story behind the Statue of Liberty’s Lesser-Known Brooklyn Twin

The Statue of Liberty, as many of us know, was a gift from France to the United States. Erected in 1886, it was unveiled with fanfare to commemorate the 100th anniversary of U.S. emancipation from British rule in 1776. Since then, she’s become one of the most symbolically powerful statues the world has ever seen, inextricably linked with the country’s pledge of “liberty and justice for all.” The 151-foot-tall copper figure has also been a galvanizing emblem for immigrants the world over—a piece of art that symbolizes democracy and served to welcome those who arrived in the U.S. through New York’s Ellis Island, as they entered a new home they heard was filled with opportunities that had eluded them elsewhere. 
When Charles Higgins, an Irish immigrant turned prominent Brooklyn businessman, conceived of Minerva, he had Lady Liberty—and a statue’s power to bring awareness to history—in mind. At the time, in the early 1900s, Higgins lived not far from Brooklyn’s Battle Hill, the land on which the Battle of Brooklyn—the first and biggest Revolutionary War battle after the signing of the Declaration of Independence—took place in 1776.
Read this very cool piece by Alexxa Gotthardt here.